Bon Ku – Design Thinking in Healthcare

Play

This week we are joined by Bon Ku, the Assistant Dean for Health and Design and an Associate Professor at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, to talk about design thinking and medicine. Bon is a practicing emergency medicine physician and the founder and director of JeffDESIGN, a first-of-its-kind program in a medical school that teaches future physicians to apply human-centered design to healthcare challenges. Bon has spoken widely on the intersection of health and design thinking (TEDx, South by Southwest, Mayo Clinic Transform, Stanford Medicine X, Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture) and serves on the Design and Health Leadership Group at the American Institute of Architects. Bon talks with us about what design thinking is, how he got into it, why he thinks physicians would benefit from learning to think in this way, and how to apply it to common primary care challenges, like walk-ins. He also directs listeners to the following resources to learn more about design thinking in medicine: the Stanford Dschool, and ideou.

If you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

Journal Club – Los Angeles Safety Net Program eConsult System Was Rapidly Adopted and Decreased Wait Times to See Specialists

Play

For this week’s journal club, we are talking about a recent paper from Health Affairs entitled: Los Angeles Safety Net Program eConsult System Was Rapidly Adopted and Decreased Wait Times to See Specialists  by Michael Barnett, Hal F. Yee Jr, Ateev Mehotra, and Paul Giboney. The paper describes and analyzes data from an e-consult system that was rolled out to a network of hundreds of safety-net clinics in Los Angeles County. We are thrilled to have the lead author, Michael Barnett, join us for our discussion! Michael is an Assistant Professor at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and a primary care physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He publishes prolifically on a variety of topics, and is particularly interested in the primary care-specialty care interface.

Do you use e-consults in your practice? Or do you wish you had access to such a system? Please tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast, or drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. And, let us know what manuscripts you think we should look at in future journal clubs or who we should have on to talk about their work. We look forward to hearing from you, and thanks for listening.

Less AND More Are Needed to Assess Primary Care – Rebecca S. Etz et al

Play

On this week’s journal club, David Rosenthal, Audrey Provenzano, and Thomas Kim discuss Less AND More are Needed to Assess Primary Care, which was recently published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine by Rebecca Etz, PhD, Martha M. Gonzalez, BS, E. Marshall Brooks, PhD, and Kurt C. Stange, MD PhD.

The study utilized surveys to assess the lacuna between current quality measures and attributes of high quality primary care, and make the case that as policymakers and payers work to reduce the administrative burden of quality measurement more attention should be paid to measuring domains of high quality primary care.

What do you think? How do you know good primary care when you see it? How should the quality of primary care be assessed?

Please tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast, or drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. And, let us know what manuscripts you think we should look at in journal clubs and who we should have on to talk about their work. We look forward to hearing from you, and thanks for listening!

David Levine: Home Hospital Research

Play

On our premier show, Dr. David Levine, a general internist and research fellow in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School talks about his research looking at home hospitalization. Instead of admitting patients to the floors from the ED, he admits them back home. He also reflects on some of his other research and interests in the quality of outpatient care, digital health technology, and novel methods of care delivery.

Check out an article about David’s research in the Boston Globe, a video about his home hospital work, and one of his other publications that we talk about in the show, comparing doctors to symptom checking software.

We also reference Bruce Leff, a leader of the home hospital movement in the US; Community Servings, an organization in the Boston area dedicated to bringing wholesome food to the chronically ill; and Iora Health, an innovative healthcare delivery organization.