Partnering Primary Care & Public Health — Lloyd Michener

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Can we solve chronic disease using a medical model? In this episode, the first in a series with speakers from the 2017 second Starfield Summit, we talked with Dr. Lloyd Michener – the principal investigator of the Practical Playbook, which facilitates the integration of primary care and public health – about why primary care clinicians need to collaborate with public health agencies to tackle chronic disease, how to look at data differently to identify what’s really happening in our communities, and how primary care can be a better partner in community collaborations.

Lloyd Michener is a professor of Community and Family Medicine at Duke, the department’s former chair, and one of the country’s pre-eminent authorities on reducing health disparities through community health, community engagement, and practice redesign. Lloyd also leads the technical support service of the BUILD Health Challenge (bold, upstream, integrated, local, and data-driven), a national competitive award program aimed at improving hospital, community, and public health collaborations that improve health. He has also served as President of the Association for Prevention Teaching & Research, Chair of the Council of Academic Societies and as a member of the Board of the Association of Academic Medical Colleges. You can also learn more about his personal and professional journey here.

The Starfield Summit brought together leaders in primary care, clinicians, experts, advocates, patients, and community members – this year in order to collaborate in paving paths towards health equity and social accountability. The Summit was primarily sponsored by Family Medicine for America’s Health, Oregon Health & Science University, and OCHIN.  Stay tuned in upcoming weeks for more speakers from the Starfield Summit.

This interview was edited lightly for clarity.

Photo credit: Duke

Dave Chokshi – Population Health Management

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This week, we are joined by Dave Chokshi. Dave is the Chief Population Health Officer of OneCity Health and Senior Assistant Vice President at New York City Health + Hospitals—the largest public health care system in the U.S. He practices primary care at Bellevue Hospital and is a Clinical Associate Professor of Population Health and Medicine at the NYU School of Medicine.

We talk about what population health is, how it is distinct from public health, and what value it adds to our healthcare system. We also talk about how in some ways it might contribute to the erosion of relationships between primary care providers and patients, how that can be remedied, and how the small 1 or 2 doctor practice may fit into a population health management vision. We talk about a piece he wrote with Neil Calman and Diane Hauser about what they call the “expanded denominator,” and how that may further goals of public health and accountable care. Lastly, we talk about population health approaches in urban and rural settings, and how we should think about the opioid epidemic from a population health vantage point.

We reference a few articles throughout our conversation: Christine Sinsky’s already classic Annals paper detailing that physicians spend two hours on administrative tasks for every hour they see patients, and our journal club on that paper. Robin Williams’ and colleagues Health Affairs blog on utilizing the HIV cascade of care to battle the opioid epidemic, and Lawrence Casalino and colleagues work calculating what we spend measuring the care we provide. In addition, we reference the Surgeon General Vivek Murthy’s landmark report on addiction.

A quick note about a word we use frequently but didn’t pause to define for listeners – attribution. Attribution is the assignment of a specific patient to a specific primary care physician in a health system. Once a patient is attributed to a PCP or health system, that PCP and health system is held accountable for the patient’s quality measures and healthcare costs within ACOs or other alternative payment contracts. This still applies patients who do not frequently access the healthcare system through traditional channels or most frequently see specialists, who perhaps have never seen the assigned PCP, and is therefore at times controversial.

A little more background on Dr. Dave Chokshi: He was Assistant Vice President of Ambulatory Care Transformation at NYC Health + Hospitals and director of Population Health Improvement at NYU School of Medicine. In 2012-13, he served as a White House Fellow at the U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs, where he was the principal health advisor in the Office of the Secretary. His prior work experience spans the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, including positions with the New York City and State Departments of Health, the Louisiana Department of Health, a startup clinical software company, and the nonprofit Universities Allied for Essential Medicines, where he was a founding member of the Board of Directors.

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