David Himmelstein – Blending Research & Advocacy

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Our guest this week is David Himmelstein. He is a distinguished professor of public health and health policy in the CUNY School of Public Health at Hunter College, adjunct clinical professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and lecturer in medicine at Harvard Medical School. He has served as chief of the division of social and community medicine at Cambridge Hospital.

David has authored or co-authored more than 100 journal articles and three books, including widely cited studies of medical bankruptcy and the high administrative costs of the U.S. health care system. His 1984 study of patient dumping led to the enactment of EMTALA, the law that banned that practice. He is also a co-founder of Physicians for a National Health Program and is a principal author of PNHP articles published in the JAMA and the New England Journal of Medicine in conjunction with Dr. Steffie Woolhandler.

We talk about how he got his start in research by looking at patient dumping practices as a trainee, and how he views advocacy as a natural outgrowth of his research findings. We also talk about his work as a leader in advocacy for a national health insurance program and talk about a few common arguments against such policy changes. Lastly, he gives some advice for folks early in their career who would like to follow his model of research blended with advocacy.

If you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes, google play, or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you, and thanks for listening.

Lauren A Taylor – Integration of Healthcare and Social Services

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Today we’re joined by Lauren A Taylor, a health services researcher based at Harvard Business School, where is she is earning her doctorate in health policy and management. Prior to joining HBS, Lauren co-authored The American Health Care Paradox, which has become required reading at a variety of medical and public health schools across the country. Our discussion spans a range of topics and should excite clinician and policymaker listeners alike, especially those interested in addressing upstream factors that affect health in our American society.

We start with reviewing the initial research paper that lay the groundwork for her book and what other countries show us about how government spending on social services can affect health outcomes, as well as what she learned interviewing caregivers and social services workers in the US.  We also talk on how American sociopolitical factors influence our discourse on the distribution and allocation of resources as well as how research is done in her field. We discuss whether health systems are moving in the right direction addressing social determinants of health through ACOs, why management gets overlooked and undervalued as a key ingredient in healthcare delivery, and why it’s just so hard to get all of this right.

Lauren’s work focuses on organizational theory and strategy in health care, with a particular emphasis on the integration of health and social services. She holds a BA in the History of Medicine and a Master in Public Health from Yale University. She has also worked as a health care chaplain and studied ethics as a Presidential Scholar at Harvard’s Divinity School.

If you like the show, please subscribe on our website www.rospod.org, and rate us on iTunes and Stitcher and share us on social media. Get in touch via twitter @RoSpodcast or drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. Thanks for listening!

Journal Club – How do Pregnant Women Use Quality Measures when Choosing Their Obstetric Provider?

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Today we’re discussing a paper published in the January 2017 issue of Birth titled: How do pregnant women use quality measures when choosing their obstetric provider? by Rebecca A. Gourevitch MS, Ateev Mehrotra MD, MPH, Grace Galvin MPH, Melinda Karp MBA, Avery Plough BA, Neel T. Shah MD, MPP.

The researchers utilized an online forum for pregnant women, Ovia Pregnancy to survey women about how and why they chose their obstetric provider. Interestingly, they found that most women did not utilize quality measures such as c-section rate or obstetric infection rates when choosing a provider. These fascinating findings were widely covered in the media and led to a great discussion. Please have a listen!

Please tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast, or drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. And, let us know what manuscripts you think we should look at in journal clubs and who we should have on to talk about their work. We look forward to hearing from you, and thanks for listening!

Seth Berkowitz – Food Insecurity and Chronic Disease

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This week we are joined by Seth Berkowitz to talk about his research examining the associations between food insecurity and health outcomes. Seth is a primary care physician, Instructor of Medicine, and is on faculty in the Division of General Internal Medicine and the Diabetes Research Center at Massachusetts General Hospital.

Seth’s research interests include population management, food insecurity, cost-related medication underuse and the impact of adverse social circumstances on chronic disease management. His goal is to develop and disseminate interventions and care delivery models that address social and economic needs.

Today he joins us to talk about a recent collaboration, funded by an award from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Evidence for Action Program, with Community Servings. Community Servings is a Boston-based non-profit organization dedicated to bringing medically tailored meals to chronically ill adults. The study aims to assess whether individuals receiving the medically tailored meals have lower rates of inpatient hospitalization, ED utilization, and medical expenditures.

You can find a piece co-authored by Seth and David Waters, the CEO of Community Servings here, and the Health Affairs article Seth and I talked about examining the effect of eliminating use of SNAP, or food stamps, for sugary sweetened beverages here.

Lastly, if you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

 

Andrew Schutzbank – Iora Health

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This week we are joined by Andrew Schutzbank, the Vice President of Product and Technology at Iora Health. His passion for revolutionizing health care began as a medical student at Tulane in pre- and post-Katrina New Orleans and continued during his Internal Medicine & Primary Care residency at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He writes at schutzblog.com and joins us today to talk his work at Iora Health.

We discuss how the idea of completely starting over brought him to Iora Health after his residency, how Iora Health’s model works and how they navigate risk, the central role of Health Coaches in the care team, what challenges Iora is still grappling with, about Iora Health’s novel EHR, Chirp, and finish up with his reflections on how software development and patient care are similar.

Please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

Emma Sandoe – Update on the AHCA & ACA

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This week, we are publishing the show a few days early to bring you a timely AHCA and ACA update. We are joined once again by Emma Sandoe, a PhD candidate in Health Policy & Political Analysis at Harvard University, for a discussion of the AHCA, the most recent attempt to repeal the ACA. You can find our prior episode with Emma, about the ACA, here. Prior to starting her PhD program, Emma spent six years in Washington, DC working on the passage and implementation of the ACA. She served as the spokesperson for Medicaid and HealthCare.gov at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and worked on ACA coordination at the HHS Budget Office.

We start with a summary of what happened this week and what were key factors in the ACHA’s demise (2:45), in particular the key Essential Health Benefits (9:00), talk about the future of the ACA (14:05), and ways that opponents of the law may try to sabotage it’s success over the next few years (15:25), and finally how lawmakers might address some of the very real problems with the law (16:57).

It turns out that healthcare reform is complicated, and advocacy does work as this Washington Post article shows. Listen to a show all about block grants and per capita caps on Medicaid featuring Matt Broaddus of the Center on Budget and Priorities here.

If you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

David Buck – Caring for High Need, High Cost Patients

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This week, Thomas Kim hosts the show and interviews Dr. David Buck, a family physician and professor of family and community medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine.  He is the founder and president of Patient Care Intervention Center (PCIC), an organization that uses advanced population health methods to target super-utilization of the health care system and intervenes through intensive care coordination and case management. It’s based in Houston, Texas and recently opened a branch in Dallas, and they were recently featured on PBS NewsHour. Prior to Dr. Buck’s work at PCIC, he founded Healthcare for the Homeless – Houston (HHH), now a federally qualified health center for over 7,000 homeless in Harris County, as well as the associated Houston Outreach Medicine Education and Social Services (HOMES) clinic, a student-managed clinic at HHH in conjunction with BCM and the University of Texas Health Science Center. He is a co-founder of the Houston-based physician advocacy group Doctors for Change, and founded the Houston-Galveston Albert Schweitzer Fellowship. He helped found the international street medicine institute, and was appointed to the 15-member Consumer Operated and Oriented Plan Program advisory board created as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in 2012.
You can find some CDC resources about Adverse Childhood Experiences, or ACEs here, and a New Yorker article about the effects of ACEs on health here.
Dr. Buck is a graduate of the Baylor College of Medicine and the University of Texas School of Public Health, as well as family medicine residency at the University of Rochester.

Matt Broaddus: What are Medicaid Block Grants?

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This week we are joined by Matt Broaddus to talk about block granting Medicaid, which is a major health policy change that the Trump administration plans to pursue in the coming months. Matt is a Research Analyst in the Health Division at The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a non-partisan research and policy institute in Washington DC. His policy, research, and analytical work is conducted in the areas of Medicaid and the State Child Health Insurance Programs.

We start with an overview of the Medicaid program, the largest insurance program in the US. We touch on the possible benefits of block granting (19:00), and how it may affect other industry stakeholders such as health systems, hospitals, community health centers, and insurers that offer Medicaid managed care products (23:20). Lastly we discuss another block granted program, CHIP and why many see it as a successful block grant program (29:00), and one other suggestion that has been made for Medicaid reform, per-capita funding (32:45).

You can find the article we mentioned by Sara Rosenbaum here, as well as some additional resources on block grants from Kaiser Health News and The Commonwealth Fund.

If you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

Photo: President Lyndon B Johnson surrounded by supporters and advisors signing Medicare into law.

Emma Sandoe: Affordable Care Act Repeal Update

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Emma Sandoe, a PhD student in Health Policy Political Analysis at Harvard University, joins us for a discussion of the Affordable Care Act. Prior to starting her PhD program, Emma spent six years in Washington, DC working on the passage and implementation of the ACA. She served as the spokesperson for Medicaid and HealthCare.gov at the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and worked on ACA coordination at the HHS Budget Office.

We start with an overview of the ACA and then review key players in the repeal and replace efforts thus far (5:25); the recent CBO report and the possibility of an insurance premium death spiral (15:00); the likelihood of Trump’s ability to keep his promise to retain the popular provisions of the ACA and what a replacement law might look like (18:00); the ACA’s flaws and some historic context for them (24:12); and give some well-hedged predictions for the coming weeks (32:05).

We discuss a report released last week by the Congressional Budget Office projecting what might happen if the ACA is repealed without a replacement, and two articles from healthcare reporter Sarah Kliff looking at potential ACA replacement plans and a story about discontent with the ACA among beneficiaries. Here is a helpful article from New York Times reporter Margot Sanger-Katz looking at what President Trump’s executive order against the ACA might mean. You can find the resources for getting involved Emma mentioned here.

Follow us and tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast and check out our facebook page at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems. Or, you can email us at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you. And thanks for listening.

Welcome to Review of Systems – Your Primary Care Podcast

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Welcome to Review of Systems, your podcast for discussion of primary care innovation, payment reform, health care policy, and more. Our mission is to produce a weekly show that will engage clinicians, administrators, policy makers and public health officials in a conversation about how we can make primary care better for our patients.

The show is produced and hosted by Audrey Provenzano, an internist in the Boston area, with co-hosts Thomas Kim, a family practice physician in Houston, and David Rosenthal, an internist in Connecticut.

Our first show is coming next week! Stay tuned!