Reprise – Natalie Spicyn, Unionizing Clinicians

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This week we are joined by Natalie Spicyn, an internist and pediatrician at Chase Brexton, a Federally Qualified Community Health Center in Baltimore. Like all FQHCs, Medicaid patients are a large portion of the Chase Brexton payor mix, but the clinic also provides specialized care for a large and active LGBT and HIV positive community in the city.  Last year, caregivers and administrators faced conflict regarding proposed workflow, volume, and compensation restructuring. Several employees were terminated during early efforts at unionization; ultimately, clinicians voted to unionize and attempt collective bargaining.  Natalie published an op-ed in the Baltimore Sun during this tumultuous period, and joins us to talk about her experiences with unionizing, fair compensation practices in primary care, and how all of this affects patient care.

Photo: Rally outside Chase Brexton Health Care in Baltimore, Maryland, on Aug. 19, 2016. Photo: Jay Mallin, jay@jaymallinphotos.com, Courtesy of 1199 SEIU

Lisa Sanders – Patient Stories & Zebras

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This week, we are joined by Lisa Sanders. You may recognize her name from the monthly “Diagnosis” column that she writes for the New York Times Magazine. She writes about unusual cases and diagnostic dilemmas, exploring both a patient’s experience of disease but also their journey through the healthcare system. She is the author of a book exploring similar themes, Every Patient Tells a Story. Her column was the inspiration for the popular TV show House, and she served as a technical advisor for the show. Dr. Sanders is an associate professor of medicine and a clinician educator in the primary care internal medicine residency program at Yale University School of Medicine.

Today, we talk about her journey in medicine, going from outsider to insider in medicine, and using English rather than medicalese. She talks about what it is like to live in a world of zebras when most of us are used to horses, and how she finds her fantastic cases. Lastly, she shares what it is like to work as a technical advisor on a hit TV show.

Send your interesting cases to Dr. Sanders for her column: lisa.sandersmdATgmail.com.

If you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

Andrew Schutzbank – Iora Health

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This week we are joined by Andrew Schutzbank, the Vice President of Product and Technology at Iora Health. His passion for revolutionizing health care began as a medical student at Tulane in pre- and post-Katrina New Orleans and continued during his Internal Medicine & Primary Care residency at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. He writes at schutzblog.com and joins us today to talk his work at Iora Health.

We discuss how the idea of completely starting over brought him to Iora Health after his residency, how Iora Health’s model works and how they navigate risk, the central role of Health Coaches in the care team, what challenges Iora is still grappling with, about Iora Health’s novel EHR, Chirp, and finish up with his reflections on how software development and patient care are similar.

Please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

Natalie Spicyn: Unionizing Clinicians

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This week we are joined by Natalie Spicyn, an internist and pediatrician at Chase Brexton, a Federally Qualified Community Health Center in Baltimore. Like all FQHCs, Medicaid patients are a large portion of the Chase Brexton payor mix, but the clinic also provides specialized care for a large and active LGBT and HIV positive community in the city.  Last year, caregivers and administrators faced conflict regarding proposed workflow, volume, and compensation restructuring. Several employees were terminated during early efforts at unionization; ultimately, clinicians voted to unionize and attempt collective bargaining.  Natalie published an op-ed in the Baltimore Sun during this tumultuous period, and joins us to talk about her experiences with unionizing, fair compensation practices in primary care, and how all of this affects patient care.

Photo: Rally outside Chase Brexton Health Care in Baltimore, Maryland, on Aug. 19, 2016. Photo: Jay Mallin, jay@jaymallinphotos.com, Courtesy of 1199 SEIU

Journal Club: Sinsky et al, Allocation of Physician Time in Ambulatory Practice

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David Rosenthal, Thomas Kim, and Audrey Provenzano discuss the recent manuscript published in Annals of Internal Medicine by Sinsky and colleagues, Allocation of Physician Time in Ambulatory Practice: A Time and Motion Study in 4 Specialties.

Have you ever wondered how much time you spend each month fighting with technology or filling out VNA forms? Well, Christine Sinsky and her colleagues studied this and have some answers for us…all of which raise more fascinating questions about how we practice medicine.

Tweet us your thoughts @rospodcast, and send us feedback at contact@rospod.org!