Andrew Bazemore – Community Vital Signs: Achieving Equity through Primary Care Means Checking More than Blood Pressure

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“How do we get the data and the information necessary to address health?”

In this episode, another in a series with speakers from the 2017 second Starfield Summit, we talked with Dr. Andrew Bazemore about how primary care occupies the juncture between public health and health care. Andrew believes achieving health equity necessarily involves harnessing the democratization of data by pairing aggregated population health data to patient data in EHRs. We talked about his vision of Community Vital Signs and the challenges to getting there; the legacy of Sidney Kark, H. Jack Geiger, Gene Farley, and Curtis Hames and how they would drool at modern geographic information systems; how Community Vital Signs could help triage patients and help them achieve better health; and the potential for ecological fallacy in the work.

Andrew Bazemore is a practicing family physician and the Director of the Robert Graham Center, which he joined in 2005. He oversees and participates in the Center’s research with a particular interest in access to care for underserved populations, health workforce & training, and spatial analysis. He has authored over 150 peer-reviewed publications, while leading the Center’s emphasis on developing tools that empower primary care providers, leaders, and policymakers.  He also serves on the faculties of the Departments of Family Medicine at Georgetown University and Virginia Commonwealth University, and in the Department of Health Policy at George Washington University School of Public Health. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine(NAM), and appointed member of the federal Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME).

The Starfield Summit brought together leaders in primary care, clinicians, experts, advocates, patients, and community members in 2017 to collaborate in paving paths towards health equity and social accountability. The Summit was primarily sponsored by FMAHealth, OH&SU, and OCHIN.  Stay tuned in upcoming weeks for more speakers from the Starfield Summit.

If you enjoyed the show, please give us 5 stars wherever you listen. Tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast and leave us a message on our facebook page at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems. Or, you can email me at thomasATrospod.org. We’d love to hear from you, and thanks for listening.

This interview was edited lightly for length and clarity.

Nwando Olayiwola – primary care, tech, and leadership

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How can we use tech to make healthcare better and more accessible? Dr. Nwando Olayiwola, a family physician, faculty member at UCSF, and Chief Clinical Transformation Officer for RubiconMD, a leading provider of electronic consultations between primary care and specialty care providers, has spent many years thinking about that question. She joins us this week to tell us about her career in primary care, tech, and leadership. We also discuss her powerful essay, Racism in Medicine: Shifting the Power, and her research looking at various aspects of tech and care delivery.

Thank you to the Harvard Center for primary care for helping to facilitate this interview. I did make a few recording snafus on this interview – so my apologies for the sub-optimal audio quality in a few sections.

A little more about our guest: Dr. Nwando Olayiwola is a family physician and the inaugural Chief Clinical Transformation Officer for RubiconMD, a leading provider of electronic consultations between primary care and specialty care providers. She is also currently an Associate Clinical Professor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at University of California, San Francisco. She served as the Director of the UCSF Center for Excellence in Primary Care until February 2017. In that role, she supported the Center in achieving strategic objectives around primary care transformation and systems redesign regionally, nationally and internationally. Prior to her work at UCSF, Dr. Olayiwola served as the Chief Medical Officer of the largest Federally Qualified Health Center system in Connecticut, Community Health Center, Inc. (CHCI), where she developed expertise in medical administration, translational and implementation research, professional development, systems based and quality improvement and practice transformation of twelve primary care practices into Patient-Centered Medical Homes. Her work led to CHCI being one of the first organizations in the United States to receive both the NCQA Level 3 PCMH and Joint Commission PCMH Recognitions. She has been a leader in harnessing technology to increase access to care for underserved and disenfranchised populations and is an expert in the areas of health systems reform, practice transformation, health information technology and primary care redesign. She is on the advisory board of Primary Care Progress and the Robert Graham Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care Policy.

If you enjoyed the show, please give us 5 stars wherever you listen. Tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast and leave us a message on our facebook page at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems. Or, you can email me at audreyATrospod.org. We’d love to hear from you, and thanks for listening.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Understanding how to return joy to practice with Christine Sinsky

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In order to make primary care better, we have to understand what is working and what isn’t – and not just in broad strokes, but in granular detail. Dr. Christine Sinsky is on the cutting edge of this type of research, and publishes prolifically on what is driving burnout in primary care, what specific steps we can take to fix it, and how to return joy to practice. Dr. Sinsky is the VP of Professional Satisfaction at the AMA and has practiced as a general internist for 30 years in Dubuque, Iowa. We talk about her landmark work with Tom Bodenheimer, which introduced the idea of the quadruple aim in 2013, how new EHR metrics can improve how we deliver care and improve the experience of caregivers and patients, and the extent of the burnout crisis in medicine at large, not just primary care. You can find the call for research that Dr. Sinksy referenced and collaborated on with Dr. Lotte Dyrbye and other leaders in this field here. We previously featured one of Dr. Sinksy’s publications, which showed that physicians spend about 2 hours doing clerical work for every 1 hour they see patients in a journal club, which you can find here.

If you enjoyed the show, please give us 5 stars wherever you listen. Tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast and leave us a message on our facebook page at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems. Or, you can email me at audrey@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you, and thanks for listening.

This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity. Photo courtesy of Christine Sinsky.

Reprise – Journal Club: Sinsky et al, Allocation of Physician Time in Ambulatory Practice

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David Rosenthal, Thomas Kim, and Audrey Provenzano discuss the landmark study published in Annals of Internal Medicine by Sinsky and colleagues, Allocation of Physician Time in Ambulatory Practice: A Time and Motion Study in 4 Specialties.

Have you ever wondered how much time you spend each month fighting with technology or filling out VNA forms? Well, Christine Sinsky and her colleagues studied this and have some answers for us…all of which raise more fascinating questions about how we practice medicine.

Tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast, and send us feedback at audrey@rospod.org!

Journal Club: Lightning Round! Primary care vs Specialty care, Doorknob moments & Cost effectiveness of buprenorphine initiation in the ED

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This week Thomas Kim, David Rosenthal, and Audrey Provenzano talk about three recently published manuscripts for a lightning round edition of Journal Club. Thomas shares a paper by Bynum et al, Outcomes in Older Adults with Multimorbidity Associated with Predominant Provider of Care Specialty, examining outcomes among patients primarily cared for by specialists vs primary care providers. David shares a paper describing a novel technology for agenda setting and evaluation of social determinants of health by Wittink et al, entitled Patient priorities and the doorknob phenomenon in primary care: Can technology improve disclosure of patient stressors? (H/T Primary Care Progress for tweeting it!). Lastly, Audrey shares a paper entitled Cost effectiveness of emergency department initiated treatment for opioid dependence by Susan Busch et al, which is a cost-effectiveness analysis of an RCT of ED-initiated buprenorphine performed at Yale, previously featured on the podcast in an interview with Gail D’Onofrio

If you enjoy the show, please give us 5 stars wherever you listen. Tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast and leave us a message on our facebook page at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems. Or, you can email me at audrey@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you, and thanks for listening.

Bon Ku – Design Thinking in Healthcare

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This week we are joined by Bon Ku, the Assistant Dean for Health and Design and an Associate Professor at the Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, to talk about design thinking and medicine. Bon is a practicing emergency medicine physician and the founder and director of JeffDESIGN, a first-of-its-kind program in a medical school that teaches future physicians to apply human-centered design to healthcare challenges. Bon has spoken widely on the intersection of health and design thinking (TEDx, South by Southwest, Mayo Clinic Transform, Stanford Medicine X, Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture) and serves on the Design and Health Leadership Group at the American Institute of Architects. Bon talks with us about what design thinking is, how he got into it, why he thinks physicians would benefit from learning to think in this way, and how to apply it to common primary care challenges, like walk-ins. He also directs listeners to the following resources to learn more about design thinking in medicine: the Stanford Dschool, and ideou.

If you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

Journal Club – How do Pregnant Women Use Quality Measures when Choosing Their Obstetric Provider?

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Today we’re discussing a paper published in the January 2017 issue of Birth titled: How do pregnant women use quality measures when choosing their obstetric provider? by Rebecca A. Gourevitch MS, Ateev Mehrotra MD, MPH, Grace Galvin MPH, Melinda Karp MBA, Avery Plough BA, Neel T. Shah MD, MPP.

The researchers utilized an online forum for pregnant women, Ovia Pregnancy to survey women about how and why they chose their obstetric provider. Interestingly, they found that most women did not utilize quality measures such as c-section rate or obstetric infection rates when choosing a provider. These fascinating findings were widely covered in the media and led to a great discussion. Please have a listen!

Please tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast, or drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. And, let us know what manuscripts you think we should look at in journal clubs and who we should have on to talk about their work. We look forward to hearing from you, and thanks for listening!

Less AND More Are Needed to Assess Primary Care – Rebecca S. Etz et al

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On this week’s journal club, David Rosenthal, Audrey Provenzano, and Thomas Kim discuss Less AND More are Needed to Assess Primary Care, which was recently published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine by Rebecca Etz, PhD, Martha M. Gonzalez, BS, E. Marshall Brooks, PhD, and Kurt C. Stange, MD PhD.

The study utilized surveys to assess the lacuna between current quality measures and attributes of high quality primary care, and make the case that as policymakers and payers work to reduce the administrative burden of quality measurement more attention should be paid to measuring domains of high quality primary care.

What do you think? How do you know good primary care when you see it? How should the quality of primary care be assessed?

Please tweet us your thoughts @RoSpodcast, or drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. And, let us know what manuscripts you think we should look at in journal clubs and who we should have on to talk about their work. We look forward to hearing from you, and thanks for listening!

Journal Club: Powers et al – Non-Emergency Medical Transportation; Delivering Care in the Era of Uber and Lyft

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This week we’re excited to bring you a journal club episode, highlighting a study published in the September 2016 issue of JAMA by Brian Powers and colleagues Scott Rhinefort and Sachin Jain from Caremore Health, entitled NonEmergency Medical transportation, Delivering care in the Era of Lyft and Uber. Powers and colleagues report on their pilot study of Caremore Health patients utilizing Uber and Lyft for non-emergency medical transportation to and from appointments.

If you like the show, please rate and review us on itunes or stitcher, which makes the show easier for others to find; and share us on social media. We tweet at @rospodcast and are on facebook at www.facebook.com/reviewofsystems.  Please drop us a line at contact@rospod.org. We’d love to hear from you.

David Levine: Home Hospital Research

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On our premier show, Dr. David Levine, a general internist and research fellow in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Primary Care at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School talks about his research looking at home hospitalization. Instead of admitting patients to the floors from the ED, he admits them back home. He also reflects on some of his other research and interests in the quality of outpatient care, digital health technology, and novel methods of care delivery.

Check out an article about David’s research in the Boston Globe, a video about his home hospital work, and one of his other publications that we talk about in the show, comparing doctors to symptom checking software.

We also reference Bruce Leff, a leader of the home hospital movement in the US; Community Servings, an organization in the Boston area dedicated to bringing wholesome food to the chronically ill; and Iora Health, an innovative healthcare delivery organization.